New article: Few pregnant women seek health care in Gedeo in southern Ethiopia

Borde MT, Loha E, Johansson KA, Lindtjorn B (2019) Utilisation of health services fails to meet the needs of pregnancy-related illnesses in rural southern Ethiopia: A prospective cohort study. PLoS ONE 14(12): e0215195. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0215195

Although maternal survival has improved in the last decades, evidence on illnesses and the use of health services during pregnancy remains scarce. Therefore, we aimed to assess the incidence and risk factors for illnesses among pregnant women and measure the use of health services. A prospective cohort study was conducted in three kebeles in rural southern Ethiopia among 794 pregnant women from May 2017 to July 2018. Each woman was followed every two weeks at home. Poisson and survival regression models were used for analysis. The incidence rate of episodes of illnesses was 93 per 100 pregnant-woman-weeks (95%CI: 90.6, 94.2), with an average of eight episodes of illnesses per woman. Anaemia accounted for 22% (177 of 794 women), and hypertension 3% (21 women of 794 women). However, utilization of health services for any illness episodes was only 8% (95%CI: 7.6%, 8.9%). The main reasons for not using health services were that the women thought the illness would heal by itself, women thought the illness was not serious, women could not afford to visit the health institutions, or women lacked confidence in the health institutions. The risk factors for illnesses are having many previous pregnancies in life time (ARR = 1.42; 95%CI = 1.02, 1.96), having history of stillbirth (ARR = 1.30; 95%CI = 1.03, 1.64), having history of abortion (AHR = 1.06; 95%CI = 1.02, 1.11), and walking more than 60 minutes to access the nearest hospital (AHR = 1.08; 95%CI = 1.03, 1.14). The risk factors for low use of health services are also having history of abortion (AHR = 2.50; 95%CI = 1.00, 6.01) and walking more than 60 minutes to access the nearest hospital (AHR = 1.91; 95%CI = 1.00, 3.63). Rural Ethiopian pregnant women experience a high burden of illness during pregnancy. Unfortunately, very few of these women utilize health services.

New article: Can we measure household Food Insecurity?

Kabalo, Bereket Yohannes, Seifu Hagos Gebreyesus, Eskindir Loha, and Bernt Lindtjørn. “Performance of an Adapted Household Food Insecurity Access Scale in Measuring Seasonality in Household Food Insecurity in Rural Ethiopia: A Cohort Analysis.” BMC Nutrition 5, no. 1 (2019/11/20 2019): 54. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40795-019-0323-6

Background  Seasonality poses a considerable food security challenge in Ethiopia. Yet, measuring seasonal variations in food insecurity, particularly the dimension of food access, lacks an adequately validated tool. We therefore evaluated the performance of an adapted Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS) to estimate seasonal variations in food insecurity (FI) among subsistence villagers in Ethiopia.

Methods  We employed a cohort study design using a panel of four repeated measurements taken in June, September, and December in the year 2017, and in March 2018. The study recruited 473 villagers from the drought-affected Wolaita area in southwest Ethiopia. The performance of the HFIAS was evaluated via internal consistency (Chronbach’s alpha values) and criterion validation techniques. The set of criteria include: parallelism between affirmative responses to FI questions and wealth strata; dose-response relationship between FI and dietary intake; and also FI severity and household wealth status.

Results  This study revealed that the HFIAS had satisfactory performance in four repeated measurements. The likelihood of affirmative responses to questions about FI decreased with ascending wealth quintiles. We observed an inverse dose-response relationship between FI and wealth status, and between FI and household dietary diversity.

Conclusions  The HFIAS showed an acceptable potential for measuring seasonal variations in FI in the study area. Our findings complement efforts to evaluate the scale’s applicability in various settings, in order to promote cross-culture monitoring and comparisons. However, it required a careful adaption for contextual and cultural sensitivities.

Successful midway evaluations for 7 PhD students

On Thursday April 25, seven PhD students admitted to the joint PhD degree programme between the Hawassa University and the University of Bergen, had their mid-way evaluations. Evaluators were senior staff from both Hawassa University and the University of Bergen.

The midway evaluation has the following goals:

  • to find the status regarding the progress and development of the individual PhD project
  • to give the candidate the possibility to present the whole project for a committee

The following students presented their projects:

Alemselam Zebdewos: Preventing iron deficiency anaemia: Evaluation of amaranth grain supplementation to 2-5 years old children in southern Ethiopia, a randomized controlled trial

Samrawit Hailu: Childhood illness and health service utilization in Wonago District, South Ethiopia. A community –based cohort study

Sewhareg Belay: Intimate Partner violence during pregnancy: Prevalence, health effect and knowledge about it in Sidama zone, Southern Ethiopia

Hiwot Hailu: Assessment of school health problems in Gedeo Zone, Southern Ethiopia

Bereket Yohannes: Assessing validity of the ‘Household Food Insecurity Access Scale’, and seasonality in food insecurity and undernutrition in rural Southwest Ethiopia

Mehretu Belayneh: Magnitude, seasonality and spatial distribution of under-nutrition among children aged 6-59 months, Boricha, Southern Ethiopia

Moges Tadesse: Maternal and Neonatal illnesses, its economic burden, and health service utilisation in rural Ethiopia: A community-based prospective cohort study

PhD student poster presentations

On December 13, all students at the PhD training programme presented their preliminary research results or their research plans. The 1.5 hour poster session took part at an international malaria scientific conference in Hawassa: International Research Seminar on Malaria Control held at Hawassa 

Again, on December 18, the Joint PhD programme between Hawassa University and the University of Bergen was presented at a seminar in Bergen: Hawassa- UiB Joint PhD program thriving

SENUPH project recruiting seven PhD students

One of the aims of the SENUPH project is to support staff capacity building. Thus, we invite staff from the universities in Hawassa, Dilla and Wolaita-Sodo to apply to join the PhD training. We plan to admit seven PhD students starting their studies in September 2016.

Interested staff are invited to present:

  1. A one-page concept note on their research aims
  2. Documentation that they have completed a masters degree
  3. A one-page CV

This information should be sent by June 15 to mailto:eskindir_loha@yahoo.comDr Eskindir Loha at Hawassa University.

An information meeting about this opportunity was held at Hawassa University on April 20.

 

Joint PhD degree programme recruiting students

Joint-PhDs are doctorates, which are done at two degree-awarding institutions. This doctorate means that you are fully registered in two universities, having to comply with admission requirements, and assessment regulations at both institutions, and it will result in one jointly awarded PhD (one diploma with the two university logos).

The other benefits for students are:

  • Access to complementary facilities and resources
  • Exposure to two cultural approaches to research
  • International student mobility
  • Enhanced acquisition of research and transferable skills, such as negotiation skills, use of videoconferencing, adaptability…
  • Better networking opportunities

Recently, Hawassa University and the University of Bergen agreed on such a joint PhD degree.

This programme is funded by The South Ethiopia Network of Universities in Public Health (SENUPH), and nine PhD students have been registered at the home institution which in this case is Hawassa University. The currently available financial support is for staff at Hawassa, Dilla and Wolaita Sodo universities. We plan to admit seven more students (four women and three men) in September 2016.

You can get more information about the admission requirements and about topics that this programme will prioritise by writing to Dr Eskindir Loha or to Professor Bernt Lindtjørn.

The structure of the joint PhD programme can bedgown loaded here (Joint PhD Curriculum_Sep 10).